Categories
Freelancing

Beginners guide to testing your Laravel application

Last night I presented my talk on getting started with testing in Laravel at the Developer User Group in Cape Town. These are the slides for this talk.

Categories
Development Freelancing

How much should I charge as a freelancer/freelance developer?

This question, along with “How do I find clients/work?”, is probably the question I get asked the most from folks starting their freelance journey. And then when I tell them what I charge (or used to charge before I started working full-time at Castos), they respond with shock, as it’s usually triple what they were expecting. So this post is a short summary of links which explain my response to that question.

The definitive guide to calculating your billable rate.

Why I charge the rate that I do.

You are too cheap! (slightly NSFW – language)

Categories
Development Plugin Course WordPress

WP Plugin Tests: planning the course

For personal reasons I don’t tend to publish my year in review or new year goals posts any more. As I start the year, something that I’ve had on my mind since forever was the idea of recording a development related course of some kind.

Here are some of the reasons I want to put some time into building some courses in 2020.

  • I like sharing knowledge with others.
  • I enjoy the process of building content around specific topics.
  • I like to look at areas that are niche/not popular, but necessary, and build content around them.
  • I’d like to find a way to monetize that somehow, to cover the time spent.
  • I find I also learn more about the thing I’m presenting.

At the end of last year I asked some folks online which subjects they felt were missing from the world of WordPress plugin development courses. After gathering the ideas, I started this year by asking my Twitter timeline to vote on what the first course should be.

The winner was Automated testing for your WordPress plugin, which to be honest was a) the course I wanted to create first any way and b) the one I think the world of WordPress plugin development needs the most right now. So here we are.

Planning

I’ve started sketching out the basic outline of what I think the course should contain, and I’m posting it here to gather some feedback. As I think about it some more, and start putting the course-ware together, I’m sure I’ll add to this list, but I want to get some community feedback, in case I miss anything.

If you’re interested in learning about writing tests for your WordPress plugin, please feel free to comment on what I’ve already included, what you would like to see, or anything else you feel should be included.

If you’d like to keep updated about the course and it’s development, or when it launches, please enter your email and hit subscribe below.

WordPress Plugin Automated Testing course notes:

The project – the example plugin we’ll be using to write tests for

  • MailChimp sign up form
  • Posts to MailChimp API
  • Form shortcode

Tools – the tools we’ll be learning about

  • PHUnit
    • WordPress recommended version vs latest stable version
  • WP CLI
  • WordPress Plugin scaffolding

Setup

  • Installing the tools
  • Phpunit.xml config file
  • Command line vs IDE setup

Writing your first test

  • The “adding tests to a legacy codebase” conundrum

Testing

  • Action and filter hooks
  • Testing your methods/functions
  • Testing against the database

Mocking

  • Does the built in WordPress unit tests allow for mocks?
  • Mocking sending an email
  • Mocking an API request 

CodeCeption

  • Setup
  • Unit Tests with CodeCeption
  • Writing your first feature test
Categories
Experiences

Thoughts on the last 20 years.

As the year comes to a close, and I sit here in the small town of Wilderness, drinking my last beer of 2019, and watching the last fire of 2019 burn down, I contemplate the past 20 years of my life. 20 years ago (at around this time) I was a lost 22 year old, with little to no direction or career to speak of, recovering from an extremely toxic relationship/break up, wishing, as I often had done in the past, for it all to just end.

How such a small period of time as 20 years has changed all of that.

In the 20 years since that night, I met the love of my life, obtained my national diploma in programming, stumbled into the world of web development, got married, purchased a house, had two children, ran (and sold) a family business, opened a jiu jitsu club, travelled to Europe twice and lost and gained more friends along the way than I can count. If you had stopped by 20 years ago and told me all this was possible, I would have swore you were crazy.

So here’s to 2020 and the next 20 years being as action packed as the last 20 were.

Happy New Year to all, and to all a good night.

Categories
Experiences Freelancing

Additions and upgrades

It’s been just over two years since I moved into my current office space, and just over a year since I last wrote about it. As my two major hobbies outside of my work as a developer are jiu-jitsu (which not many folks can relate to), and computer hardware and peripheral upgrades (which most can at least understand) I thought it might be interesting to look back at what changes I’ve made in the tools I use every day, over the last year.

The Workstation

Last year I posted a review of how my workspace had changed over the 2 years since I left employment and become a freelance developer. It included this image of what my desk looks like, with a short run down of everything you see (and don’t see) in the picture.

My November 2018 Workspace
My November 2018 workspace

Today, just over a year later, there have been some small but important changes.

My November 2019 workspace

So besides the less bright lighting (more on that later), the more keen of eye among you will have noticed some subtle differences.

Firstly, my peripheral monitors have changed. I was able to pick up a newer Samsung and Dell 24 inch monitor, so now all three screens are LED powered, and the two side monitors are more uniform. I’ve definitely noticed the difference in the visual quality improvement in making sure all three monitors are LED, I no longer feel like I’m having to adjust my eyes when I switch between the different screens.

The other major changes are in peripherals, I’ve replaced the Logitech headseat with a Sennheiser HD 280 Pro studio set, and replaced the short mic stand with a proper desk mounted arm. This allows me better use of my screens and keyboard when I’m in online meetings or recording podcasts (which I’ve not done as much as I’d like to in 2019)

I also treated myself to a Sparkfox Atlas Wireless Bluetooth Controller. This is a great little gaming controller, which I can use connected via a USB cable or via Bluetooth, works on both Windows and Ubuntu and has a very similar layout to an XBox controller.

Finally, as I noted earlier, I’ve switched from using the oppressing overhead florescent lights to a smaller lamp which sits behind the left screen. It gives off just enough light for me to see the things I need, without making my eyes water during the day.

The Laptop

While my workstation has only undergone a few external changes over the course of the last year, I eventually decided it was time for a new laptop this year.

I usually try and use a laptop for at least 4-5 years before replacing it. I’d been mostly happy with the performance of the Dell Inspiron gaming laptop I’d purchased at the end of 2017, but I ended up doing more conferences and therefore travel in 2019 than I had done previously, and two things became clear. First, the laptop and bulky, ungainly charger became heavy when carrying them around a lot, and second, the battery only held around a 4 hour charge.

I’ve always been partial to Dells, and the Dell XPS 15 seemed the logical choice. However, an online friend had recently purchased an Asus Zenbook, and was raving about it.

After researching the differences in price and hardware between the two, and reading a bunch of online reviews, I ended up purchasing the Asus Zenbook UX533FD, and I couldn’t be happier.

It’s super light, has a 10 hour battery life, runs the latest Ubuntu (after a bios update), and is powerful enough that I feel as productive using the laptop as I do on the desktop. At the same time, I also upgraded my laptop mouse to the Logitech M720 Triathlon, the big brother of the Marathon mouse I use on my workstation, and it’s a great wireless addition to the laptop.

The bleeding edge of operating systems.

The other big change I made at the tail end of this year was upgrading both my laptop and workstation OS to the latest version of Ubuntu, 19.10, codenamed Eoan Ermine. I typically only run the latest LTS version on my workstation, and whatever is the latest release on my laptop, but the 19.10 release is so slick, stable and fast that I had to install it on the workstation. I was actually feeling left behind whenever I switched from laptop to PC.

The future

Looking ahead, I don’t think there will be much I will change in 2020, as I’ve pretty much got my perfect set up. But who knows, upgrading computers is the one hobby I do tend to like to spend money on, so I can’t make any promises.

Categories
Development Freelancing

A beginners guide to testing your existing Laravel application

Last night I gave a talk at the Cape Town PHP Meetup introducing the concepts of testing an existing Laravel application. As I did not have time to prepare slides, here are the links to the relevant items I discussed in the talk.

Confident Laravel (course, highly recommended)

Grumpy Learning (course and books, also recommended)

Laravel HTTP tests documentation

Laravel Dusk tests documentation

Snipe Migrations

DuskDatabaseMigrations Trait

Categories
Experiences WordPress

Taking a break from my WordPress community activities

It’s a funny old world. Over the course of the past few years I’ve seen a lot of people take a step back from contributing to WordPress, and I never thought I would get there. But here I am, writing about taking exactly such a break.

When I joined the WordPress community back in early 2016, it was the first global tech community I’d ever actively joined. Like the first time you learn to ride a bike, all I wanted to do was be part of this amazing thing and do as much of it as I could. Now, just 3 years later, I feel burned out and disillusioned as to what my purpose in this community really is.

Don’t get me wrong, the community is not the problem, just like riding a bike up and down your street is not the problem. But all it takes is one or two potholes, or an inconsiderate driver, and things soon take a turn for the worse.

Organising local events

I attended my first WordCamp in Cape Town in 2015, spoke at WordCamp Cape Town in 2016, lead the team for 2017 and 2018, and was part of the team again in 2019, and I need a break. I’d like to be able to attend my home town WordCamp as an attendee next year, without needing to rush from an interesting conversation to whatever next issue might need to be dealt with. I wish the 202o team all of the very best, and I’ll happily assist wherever I can, but not in an official organising capacity.

I will also be taking a step back in organising our local meetup. Fortunately one of our members has joined the meetup organising team, and if she’s as good at organising meetups as she was running Logistics for WCCT 2019, we’re in good hands. I’ll still happily help the team plan events, liase with sponsors and find speakers, but it will be great to share the load of hosting with the three currently active meetup organisers.

WP Notify

I’ve been a community team deputy for about 2 years now, and it’s been an amazing journey. For 2020 I will be taking a big step back from that team, to focus on the future of WP Notify, the notifications feature project I’ve been working on with other WordPress contributors, for the past few months. I think WP Notify is something that WordPress is desperately lacking, and I see it as an important part of moving WordPress into the future, so I want to spend all my core contribution time focused on that.

Speaker diversity training.

Besides WP Notify, my other big goal for 2020 is to do what I can to support the Speaker Diversity Training programme grow and flourish within our local community. Deb Butler has already dedicated herself to launching this training programme, and I want to do whatever I can to assist her.

I am hoping that this break from all of the many volunteer things I, knowingly, get myself into, and a focus on only one or two, will help me redefine my purpose and feel some of that joy I first had back in 2016.

Categories
Development Freelancing

WordPress Plugin Development Best Practices

This morning I presented a workshop at WordCamp Johannesburg.

Here are the slides for that workshop

Here is the GitHub repository

If you want to see the updated plugin code, with the security fixes, you’ll need to switch to the feature/more-secure-plugin branch.

Categories
Experiences Freelancing

The Process of Writing

The general recommendation to becoming a better writer, is to write every day.

Besides high school creative writing, I am mostly a self taught writer. I’ve never completed any official copy-writing courses, even though I have three purchased on Udemy from about 2 years ago. I generally don’t understand the finer details that would take me from being a blogger or writing contributor to the ranks of editing someone else’s writing work.

That being said, since I was accepted as a freelance contributor on the Skyword platform early last year, I’ve probably completed at least two written assignments per month. I’m definitely writing more than I ever have, and it’s definitely paying off. I’m seeing the benefits not only in my paid writing work, but also in the general content of my blog.

I thought that it might be useful to share the process I follow, when I am writing content for money. If nothing else, it allows me to write something else today 😉

Brain vomit

While the image above my not be pleasant, this is always my first step. When working on a specific assignment, I will have certain guidelines I need to follow, in terms of article content.

I’ll create a new blank Google Doc, paste any relevant information from the assignment at the top of the page, and then just type out whatever comes to mind. This is usually just a few words or phrases, maybe a title, or a sentence or two.

Research

Once I’ve put down the thoughts I have in my head about the topic in question, I’ll start doing some research. Often this is to clarify some points of (mis)understanding, or to fill in some gaps in my knowledge. The assignment topic will define how much research I do. If it’s in an area I know little about, I can spend up to an hour researching. As I am researching the topic, I’m starting to put together a plan of how the article will look and what the story is I want to tell.

First draft

I then start writing my first draft. This is just everything as it enters my head. I might make minor edits here or there, but mostly I just write as the thoughts come to me.

Break

This is a pretty important step, but I then take some time away from writing. I find this allows me to think about what I’ve written, if there’s anything else I want to add or take away, and allows me to come back to review what I’ve put down with ‘fresh’ eyes.

First edit

This is the most edit heavy process. I read through the content and do my best to self edit my work, taking out repetitive words, looking for other words or phrases that will convey what I’m trying to say. This is usually where I will also start adding links to relevant content, including images, and generally trimming down the content to fit specific criteria. I may also take out sentences, and sometimes whole paragraphs, that don’t fit into the edited article any more.

Second edit

Immediately once the first edit is complete I’ll start the second, and final, edit. This is where I try to just read the article from top to bottom, as a reader would. Usually this is also where I look for complex sentences and try to uncomplicated them, as well as a more detailed focus on spelling and grammar errors. I will also look at the flow of the sentences and prune them where necessary.

I’m sure my process is nothing new or unique, but it’s evolved over time and I find it works for me.

Categories
Development Experiences Freelancing

The two worst things you can say to your freelancer.

I’ve been freelancing full time for just over three years now, having spent 10 years developing for either digital agencies or small to medium sized businesses, in various roles.

In the 3+ years since I switched to freelance development, the two sentences that I’ve heard/read the most from clients, and the ones that illicit the most negative responses in me, are:

“This will only take x minutes”

“This will be easy for an experienced developer”

If you are a freelancer, and you’ve been on the receiving end of these phrases, you’ll know what I’m talking about. This post however is not for you, it’s for anyone who has ever said one of these phrases to a developer, or who might not understand why they are so negative.

“This will only take x minutes”

x is usually a variable number, ranging anywhere from ‘a few’ to 30. Sometimes minutes is replaced by hours. Either way, the reason this phrase is so despised by freelancers is that it indicates to us that you think you know more about what we do, than we do.

If you know something will take 5 minutes, that means you understand the problem fully, as well as the possible solutions required to solve it and also which one to apply to solve it within 5 minutes. This means you can do it yourself. And it is therefore a lie, because if you could do something in 5 minutes yourself, you would not be hiring someone to do it for you.

“This will be easy for an experienced developer”

Personally, this one is worse than the previous phrase, and here’s why.

This phrase tells me you understand that I am experienced in my field, that I am knowledgeable, and you recognise that I can fix your problem. What it also tells me is that while you recognise my ability to fix your problem, you don’t value my knowledge enough to pay what it’s going to cost.

What is happening in both instances is that you’re trying to get me to keep my price down, because you think it will be a simple solution and you assume therefore it will be quick to fix. Unfortunately, in most cases, you’re making the same mistakes as the folks who thought that Titanic was unsinkable.

If the problem was a 5 minute solution, you wouldn’t need to hire me to fix it. And my experience, comes with a price. You either value the fact that I am capable of solving your problem, or you are looking for a cheap solution, which usually means taking shortcuts, something that I am not prepared to do.

Successful solutions take time, planning and thorough testing. By making assumptions up front, you are setting the project up for failure, and nobody wants that.